How to check if you are vulnerable for the DROWN attack (CVE-2016-0800).

CVE-2016-0800, also known as the DROWN attack, is an attack against servers that still support the old SSLv2 protocol. The only reason a server would still offer to use SSLv2 would be for possible compatibility reasons with 20-year-old PCs ( -> there is no reason to use or offer SSLv2 any more). From a configuration side you can disable the v2 protocol by adding  -SSLv2 to the list of protocols being used.

Where and how you configure this depends on the software, but using all -SSLv2 -SSLv3 is fine with most modern servers and clients, Mozilla has a fantastic overview for configuring SSL and TLS.

If you want to check a bunch of your hosts remotely, you can use the sslv2 script included with nmap like this:

Where hostname would be either a FQDN, or an IP, or an IP range. You can swap out  sslv2 with  ssl-enum-ciphers to see all SSL /TLS ciphers and protocols the server offers.

 


Granular OSSEC Emails

Occasionally I see questions on the OSSEC mailing list on how to send a bunch of alerts only to a specific email address. An example for a typical use case would be different departments responsible for different groups of servers and having alerts only go to them. OSSEC has a few options for sending Alerts to specific email addresses, but it only adds those email addresses to the alert (meaning it always goes to the global email address). Sometimes this isn’t desirable.

A workaround is setting the global email recipient to a blackhole email address (something that is aliased to /dev/null on the mail server) and only using the granular settings for delivering mail.

You can then use attributes like the rule ID, group names, or event locations to split up alerts to different recipients. The downside is that by doing this, you will miss alerts with  <options>alert_by_email</options> and a low level, unless you add a few granular email alerts. Rule 1002 (catch-all $BAD_WORDS) is a good candidate you will want to keep on receiving. Rules 501-504 (OSSEC agent/master status alerts) could also be interesting; either add an <email_alert>  for each rule individually, or overwrite the rules adding  <group>ossec,</group> to then, so you can add one <email_alert>  for the group of rules.

We use this system pretty extensively assigning alerts to email groups by <event_location>  and/or <group>

An example for the email block could look like this:

 


A script to diff files/directories on two different servers

Ok,  short one today. This is a straightforward script that simplifies comparing directories on different servers. There is no magic in it, it just rsyncs the directories to a local temp directory and runs diff against them (then deletes the directory afterwards). Mainly intended for config files, I wouldn’t recommend trying to diff gigabytes of binaries with it.

 


Renewing “Let’s Encrypt” SSL certificates

Let’s Encrypt provides free DV SSL certificates for everyone and is now in the open beta phase. I’m not going to go into the details of which of the clients are best, since that depends entirely on your use case (I use acme-tiny and a rule in varnish to intercept all calls to /.well-known/acme-challenge/).

Since the certificates are only valid for 90 days, I often see people suggesting to just renew them via cronjob every 2 months. I find this to be really awful advice, if that renewal fails for any reasons (network problems, local problems, problems with let’s encrypt) the next renewal is a month after the certificate expired. It is also pretty inflexible (what if you would rather prefer to renew them after 80 days).

I use openssl to check daily how long the certificate is still valid, and if a threshold has been reached it tries to renew the certificate (I believe the official client has this functionality too). And if the certificate isn’t renewed by a 2nd threshold, it sends an email altering the admin of the problem (for manually intervening and fixing whatever went wrong).

At the end of this posting I’ll add the complete script, but the quickest way to check how long a certificate is still valid is to use openssl x509 -in -checkend. It will return 0 if the file is still valid in x seconds, and 1 if the certificate doesn’t exist or if the certificate will be expired by then. Just multiply the number of days by 86400 and check if the certificate is still valid:

The openssl binary has a few nice options for looking at certificates (both local files and remotely connecting to a server and looking at the provided certificate)
Show information about a local certificate file: openssl x509 -text -noout -in
Connect to a remote server and display the certificate provided: openssl s_client -showcerts -servername foo.bar -connect IP:PORT | openssl x509 -text -noout  (servername foo.bar is only required if you are connecting to a server and need to use SNI to request a cert for a specific domain, i.e. a webserver providing multiple domains on port 443 via SNI. It can of course be omitted if you don’t need it.)

This is the full script I use for checking and renewing certs. It basically just loops through a list of domains, checks if any of the date thresholds are met and then renews certificates/send emails.


Convert configuration files to ansible templates

I’ve been playing around with ansible a lot lately, and I noticed that while changing stuff from “installed and configured manually” to “installed and configured by ansible” I was running into quite a few configuration files that needed to be manually turned into templates. It can be quite tedious to replace values in a configuration file with placeholders and put all those placeholders in a .yml file with default values.
Automating this is something I would have typically done in perl, but since I wanted to learn more about using regex in bash I decided to have a go at it in bash using regex and ${BASH_REMATCH}

The script takes a configuration file and spits out an ansible template, as well as the variable definitions you will need to add to your defaults/main.yml or vars/main.yml

The whole script is a bit to long to post here, but the interesting part is:

(You can download the full script here ansible_template.sh).

You can use regular expressions in a [[ ]] with =~ (e.g. if [[ “boot” =~ ^b ]]), and you can access the result of the regular expression by using ( ) to mark what parts of the result to store and access them via $BASH_REMATCH (comparable to how you would do it for other languages). Here I am parsing out anything that looks like a key=value from the configfile (with multiple possible separators) and storing the results in BASH_REMATCH[1] and BASH_REMATCH[2]

Usage of the script is pretty straightforward. you give it a prefix for the variable names (so you don’t end up with multiple roles all using a common variable name like “port”), and either a local or remote file to work with, and it spits out something like this:

There a tons of different configuration file formats out there so this script won’t work perfectly 100% of the time, but it does do quite well and reduces the manually copy&pasting to a minimum.